Blog

Al Capone and the romantic holiday that triggered his demise

February 8, 2019

Ninety years ago this week, one of the most horrifying acts of violence in organized crime history occurred inside a nondescript garage at 2122 North Clark Street in Chicago. On the morning of February 14, 1929, seven members of George “Bugs” Moran’s North Side bootlegging gang were lined up against a brick wall and shot dead. The perpetrators were never prosecuted, but few people then or now doubt that Al Capone’s Outfit was behind what the press called the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. There had been a whole lot of shooting between Chicago’s rival Irish and Italian bootleggers during Prohibition, ...

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El Chapo’s ‘criminal enterprise’ means life in prison

After hearing that a jury convicted him on all counts in his federal criminal trial on February 12, Mexican drug…

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Drama-drenched El Chapo trial nears its end

Mob News & Notes is a new monthly feature in the Mob Museum’s blog. It highlights recent stories on American…

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Twenty years later, The Sopranos remembered fondly

Twenty years ago, The Sopranos television crime series began airing on HBO, featuring a fictional New Jersey Mafia boss and his family,…

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Forensic scientists examine Mob Museum artifacts for evidence of criminal past

Forensic science, including DNA analysis and other fields related to examining blood found at a crime scene, is a powerful…

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The rise of Castro and the fall of the Havana Mob

When Fidel Castro, his brother Raul, Che Guevara and 79 other Cuban rebels piled into the 43-foot yacht Granma on…

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The Kansas City connection

In the 1995 movie Casino, the Mob’s control of skimming at Las Vegas casinos is exposed when authorities learn about…

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Hoodlums at the Statler

In the early morning hours of December 5, 1928, patrol officer Frank Osowski was walking his beat in downtown Cleveland…

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