Race and Policing in America: A History of Conflict

Race and Policing in America: A History of Conflict

Date: September 22, 2020
Time: 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Cost: Free for attendees
Watch

From slave patrols in the 19th century to the war on drugs in the 20th, the complicated history of race and policing in America remains unresolved in the 21st century. In this public forum, historians and former law enforcement officials will discuss the origins of American policing, the data and policies concerning police use of force, and the work that lies ahead.

This program is now sold out. To be added to our waitlist, please email boxoffice@themobmuseum.org with your name, number of requested tickets and the title of this program.

Click the “Watch” button at 7 p.m. on September 22 for a free, virtual livestream of this program.

Featured Speakers

Greg McCurdy, Retired Assistant Sheriff, LVMPD  

Greg McCurdy, Retired Assistant Sheriff, LVMPD


Greg McCurdy is currently the National Football League Consulting Security Representative for Las Vegas. Prior to his current role, McCurdy served as a senior subject matter expert assessing and advising police departments on how to address critical issues on the frontlines of community policing such as use of force, bias-based policing, internal investigations, patrol staffing, training, and sustainable community policing program development. McCurdy served as a Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Police Officer from June 1983 until October 2013. He served in a variety of assignments and rose through the ranks to retire as the Assistant Sheriff of the Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Investigations Group. In his last three years, he participated in the following: Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council, Chair/Major Cities Chiefs Association Intelligence Commanders Group, Major Counties Sheriffs Association Intelligence Commanders Group, Gulf States Global Police Symposium in Abu Dhabi, FEMA National Preparedness Guidelines, Presidential Policy Workgroup, principal planner for Joint Counter Terrorism Workshop Series with DHS/FBI/National Counter Terrorism Center, principal representative for LVMPD for the U.S. State Department International Law Enforcement Training Agreement (Budapest, Hungary). He is a proud native of Las Vegas and loves to travel the world.

Claytee White, Director, Oral History Research Center at UNLV Libraries  

Claytee White, Director, Oral History Research Center at UNLV Libraries


Claytee White is the inaugural director of the Oral History Research Center for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries. She collects the history of Las Vegas and the surrounding area by gathering memories of events and experiences from longtime residents. As one of five founders of the Las Vegas Black Historical Society Inc., she chronicles the history of the Las Vegas black community that was established in 1905. White received her bachelor’s degree from California State University, Los Angeles, master’s degree in history from University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and has completed work toward a doctorate at the College of William & Mary. White currently serves on the Board of Women of Diversity, the UNLV Presidential Debate Planning Committee, and the Historic Preservation Commission. White has also served on the Historic Preservation Commission for the city of Las Vegas, Nevada Humanities executive board, and is the past president of the Southwest Oral History Association.

Gloria Browne-Marshall, Professor of Constitutional Law at John Jay College of Criminal Justice  

Gloria Browne-Marshall, Professor of Constitutional Law at John Jay College of Criminal Justice


Gloria Browne-Marshall is a Professor of Constitutional Law at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY). She teaches classes in Constitutional Law, Race and the Law, Evidence, and Gender and Justice. Browne-Marshall is a civil rights attorney who litigated cases for Southern Poverty Law Center in Alabama, Community Legal Services in Philadelphia, and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Inc.. Her books include “The Voting Rights War: The NAACP and the Ongoing Struggle for Justice” (Rowman&Littlefield) and “Race, Law, and American Society: 1607 to Present” (Routledge) which includes chapters on race and Education, Voting Rights, Criminal Justice, Property, Civil Liberties and Protest, the Military and Internationalism concerning African-Americans, Latinos, Asian-Americans and Native Americans. Browne-Marshall is the founder of The Law and Policy Group, Inc., a “think tank” for the community and Executive Editor of “The Report on the Status of Black Women and Girls(r).” She has been the recipient of several honors for her work with civil rights, social justice and women’s equality issues such as the Ida B. Wells-Barnett Justice Award, Malcolm X Award, NAACP Community Service Award, and the Wiley College Women of Excellence in Law award. Browne-Marshall has completed the New York City Marathon and is a playwright of seven produced plays.

 

Tyler Parry, Assistant Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies, UNLV  

Tyler Parry, Assistant Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies, UNLV


Tyler Parry received his PhD in History from the University of South Carolina (2014), and is currently an Assistant Professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. His research examines slavery, the African diaspora, and the historical memory of slavery in the United States. His first book, Jumping the Broom: The Surprising Multicultural Origins of a Black Wedding Ritual is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. His work appears in various peer-reviewed academic journals and popular magazines and newspapers. Additionally, he currently serves as the Senior Editor of the blog Black Perspectives, and is Vice President of the African American Intellectual History Society.